Maternal Mortality

Between natural birth and CS: Women speak

Sunday, May 14, 2017

One proponent of natural birth said babies born vaginally receive a coating of immune-boosting microbes, and their intestines are more likely to have early colonisation with beneficial bacteria-protections than babies delivered surgically.
 
WHO says medical practitioners should not undertake C-sections purely to meet a given target or rate, but rather focus on the needs of patients.
 

FG Commited To Attaining Zero Maternal Deaths

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Mrs Adejoke Adefulire, the Senior Special Assistant to the Government on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) says the office will collaborate with stakeholders to attain zero under five mortality by 2030.
 
Adefulire gave the assurance on Saturday in Abuja at a national workshop organised by the Association of Female Medical Laboratory Scientists of Nigeria (AFMLN) with the theme; “Contributing to SDG three by improving child and maternal health through enlightenment and education.
 

Nurses and Midwives Must Do Something To Reduce Maternal and Infant Mortality

Friday, May 12, 2017

Senate President, Dr. Abubakar Bukola Saraki, has called on Nurses and Midwives in the country to rededicate themselves to quality service delivery in order to boost healthcare and reduce the high prevalence of infant and maternal mortality in the country.
 

Save lives, donate blood

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Every year, Nigeria loses an estimate of 59,000 women to predictable and easily prevented deaths. Each week, 1,131 women die in childbirth. In the last seven days, 1,131 Nigerian families have lost mothers, friends, sisters and daughters to pregnancy.  Every week, more children are forced to grow up without mothers, and are subjected to the difficulties that entails. These children are more likely to die before their fifth birthday.

Nigeria ranked 7th among countries facing shortage of health workers

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Nigeria is ranked 7th among 57 countries classified as facing a critical shortage of health workers, it was learnt Tuesday
.
According to the Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole the country has a shortage of 144,000 health workers.  Nigeria is ranked second in Africa behind Ethiopia with 152,000.
 
Presently, the country boasts of 240,000 nurses and midwives and by 2030 the country will be needing 149,852 doctors and 471,353 nurses and midwives.
 

World Malaria Day: Nigerians warned to stop using Chloroquine for malaria treatment

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Minister of Health, Isaac Adewole, has urged Nigerians to stop using chloroquine, or Artemisinin as a monotherapy in treatment of malaria, as he listed steps that Nigerians need to take to combat the killer disease in the country.
 

Editorial NMA’s strategic five-year plan

Friday, April 28, 2017

The Nigeria Medical Association (NMA) recently launched a five-year strategic plan to improve this country’s health sector. The plan, launched on Tuesday April 18, 2007 brought together civil society organizations and other medical associations to parley and advance the sector. Among those at the meeting to finalize the NMA Strategic Plan 2017-2022 were development partners.
 

After maternal health issues, mums bear smiles

LEFT: Asmau Suleiman being taken into the operating room in this specially constructed wheelchair RIGHT: Radiya being treated for pre-eclampsia. PHOTOS: Adie Vanessa Offiong
Sunday, April 23, 2017

Aisha Suleiman, 32, had just been delivered of her seventh child. She has a history of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) where she suffers uncontrolled bleeding after each of her pregnancies. This time, it took three pints of blood to stabilise her.
 

CAN, FOMWAN Partner On Child, Family Health

Saturday, March 4, 2017

In its effort to bring healthcare awareness to the grassroots, Federation of Muslim Women's Association in Nigeria (FOMWAN), has partnered with the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), and religious leaders of the Muslim community on issues of child and family health.
 

58,000 women dying every year is "social injustice", says Ladipo

Friday, March 3, 2017

President of the Association for Reproductive and Family Health, Professor Oladapo Ladipo says the number of women dying from pregnancy and childbirth complications every year in Nigeria is "one of the greatest injustices of our time."
 
"It is shameful that Nigeria still contributes significantly to global maternal death figure. We estimate that we are losing about 58,000 mothers annually, through pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum complications," Ladipo said.
 

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